The Common Application’s Discipline Question

In our September 2008 Newsletter, Discipline Questions on the College Application, we suggested that before students checked the “yes” box on the Common Application where it asked: “Have you ever been adjudicated guilty or convicted of a misdemeanor, felony, or other crime,” their parent should consult with an attorney. We said this … 

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What’s Your Rush?

It’s early in September and George Washington University has already received over 3,000 undergraduate applications. While we were surprised when “The GW Hatchet” reporter first contacted us about this story, it was only later that we found out that these “applications” were not much more than a show of interest. … 

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There is Life After Being Rejected

For the class of 2014, Harvard University received 30,489 and accepted 2,110. If you’re one of those 28,379 students who applied and were rejected, you may find some comfort in knowing that Harvard does indeed make mistakes. Take U.S. Senator John Kerry (D-MA), for example. He was rejected not once … 

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Lies, Damned Lies, Statistics, and Rankings

The magazines that rank our best colleges, graduate schools, boarding schools, hospitals, health plans, doctors, nursing homes, and high schools do so because they’re in the business of selling magazines. We buy into this craze. Rankings have an important place in American society. Once you learn what is actually being … 

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Double Depositing and Prolonging the Agony

For the past few weeks, colleges have been sending out their admissions decisions to applicants from across the country and around the world. The Ivy League colleges are notifying applicants today, April 1st, of all days. Hopefully, this is not an April Fool’s joke, the college has not made a … 

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More on YouTubing the College Admissions Rapids

Posting videos on YouTube in substitution for an application essay may be the latest craze in college admissions, but we at Ivy Coach doubt that too many colleges are going to adopt this practice. While a video might have value if it actually says something about the applicant, unless access … 

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Missing Parts of Your Submitted Application

If you have submitted college applications that were due January 1st, you may have received letters, postcards, or e-mail notifications that a part of your application is missing. While you may have submitted your application online, teacher recommendations and evaluations, school reports, transcripts, and standardized test score reports are, for … 

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Weighted vs. Unweighted GPA: Is There an Advantage?

With high schools across the country having different grading scales, one may wonder how colleges understand and interpret an applicant’s transcript. Some high schools have grading scales based on 100%, while others are based on 4.0, 5.0, and we’ve even seen 15.0. At some high schools, honors classes are given … 

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Waiving Rights on the College Application

On the Secondary School Report (SSR) and the Teacher Evaluation of the Common Application, the question reads: IMPORTANT PRIVACY NOTICE: Under the terms of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), after you matriculate you will have access to this form and all other recommendations and supporting documents submitted … 

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Demonstrate College Interest

In a personal and revealing op-ed piece in the April 3, 2009 edition of “The Los Angeles Times,” Angel Pérez, the director of admission at Pitzer College in Claremont, CA writes about his experiences in reviewing applications. He talks about how when he visited a high school in his assigned … 

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