Princeton Delays Reporting Admissions Statistics

Princeton has yet to release its Class of 2026 Early Action admissions statistics (photo credit: Alfred Hutter).

Princeton University has joined institutions like Cornell University, Columbia University, and Stanford University in choosing not to release admissions statistics. Of course, the data ultimately becomes publicly available and will eventually appear in our comprehensive Ivy League Admissions Statistics. So it’s not as though Princeton — or Cornell, Columbia, or Stanford for that matter — are really concealing anything. They’re really just delaying the reporting of this data. And why? Well, to make it seem like they’re trying to make the highly selective college admissions process less stressful for all. But of course! Hey, it’s not like Princeton wasn’t vocal about trying to make the highly selective college admissions process less stressful for all during the many years in which they reported the admissions data at the conclusion of the Early Action and Regular Decision rounds of admission…oh wait they were! But, Ivy Coach, are you suggesting that Princeton’s recent announcement that they’re not releasing admissions statistics is a whole lot of PR spin? Why, yes. Indeed we are!

As Princeton University’s Office of Undergraduate Admission recently announced, “We are committed to identifying and enrolling talented students from all backgrounds who will not only benefit from a Princeton education but who will use this educational experience to go on to impact and change the communities and world around them. As part of our student-centered approach to the admission process, we have been carefully considering how and when the University publishes certain data about admitted students that may have an unintended impact on prospective students and families. The Office of Admission considers each student holistically within the context of their setting to build a dynamic University community. Given this, data points such as overall admission rates and average SAT scores shouldn’t influence a prospective student’s decision about whether to apply to Princeton. We know this information raises the anxiety level of prospective students and their families and, unfortunately, may discourage some prospective students from applying. For this reason, we have in recent years stopped reporting the annual admission rate, as well as the admission rate by SAT score range and average GPA. We have now made the decision not to release admission data during the early action, regular decision and transfer admission cycles. Instead, we will publish an announcement later in 2022 that focuses on the enrolled students who will join Princeton as the Class of 2026. We believe this decision will help us keep students central to our work and tamp down the anxiety of applicants.”

But, loyal readers, have no fear because Princeton’s admissions statistics will, in less than a year’s time, be made publicly available and the data for the Class of 2026 will appear along with all the rest of the admissions statistics for each Ivy League institution — even the institutions, like Cornell (which made a similar announcement in March of 2020) and Columbia (which has been delaying the reporting for many years), that also delay the reporting. So do stay tuned.

Congratulations to all of Ivy Coach’s students who completed applications with us and applied Early Action to Princeton’s Class of 2026. You all got in! We’re so proud of you.

 
 

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1 Comment

  • Adolfo Estevez says:

    They all want to lure in the suckers. Harvard – more than others- bombards you with emails and some mailings telling you how Harvard is your home. My 2 best friends are Latino and brilliant (Val and Sal in our class), had better than Harvard’s admitted student averages in all categories, and they did not even get interviews with Harvard! We live in a major city, by the way.

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