Ivy League Yield

Some of the Ivy League yield data is out for this past Ivy League admissions cycle. The yield is the percentage of students admitted to a university who place deposits, indicating an intent to enroll. With yield data in hand, colleges then know whether or not they’ll be turning to their waitlists…and, if so, they’ll know how deep into the waitlist they’ll be going. So which Ivy League college had the strongest yield data, you ask? That would be Harvard University (as usual). Harvard’s yield for this past admissions cycle stands at almost 81%. According to “The Choice” post on Ivy League yield data, Harvard intends to admit approximately 25 students from its waitlist. This is after an admissions cycle in which Harvard admitted 5.9% of applicants (which numbered over 34,000).

Yield of Ivy League Colleges, Yield at Ivies, Ivy Yield

Which Ivy League college do you think has the highest yield?

Dartmouth College’s yield is 49.5%. That means that slightly under half of admitted students to Dartmouth indicated an intent to matriculate. To give you a sense of the numbers, of the 2,180 students offered admission to the College on the Hill, 1,080 have sent in their deposits to Hanover, New Hampshire. And what about Brown University’s yield? They’re reporting a yield of 57%. With a 9.6% admission rate at Brown, the university anticipates 1,575 students to fill its incoming class. According to “The Choice,” the university does not have plans to go to its waitlist this year.

Are you surprised that Harvard’s yield is so high every year? Do you think more students would choose not to accept their offer of admission and go with another university instead? What about Dartmouth’s yield at just under 50% (which has been pretty stable over the years)? Or Brown’s at 57%? Why do you think the yield data varies so much at each of the highly selective Ivy League colleges? Let us know your thoughts on the matter by posting below!

And check out our Ivy League Admissions Statistics.

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