Harvard Early Action Figures

Harvard Early Numbers, Harvard Early Action Numbers, Harvard Early Action Stats

We’ve got the Harvard Early Action numbers for the Class of 2018 for our readers (photo credit: chensiyuan).

The Harvard Early Action figures for the Class of 2018 are in and we’ve got them for our readers. For the Class of 2018, slightly over 21 percent of students who applied via Early Action to Harvard earned a spot in the incoming class. In all, 992 students received positive word from Harvard University, as announced on Friday. This marked the highest Early Action acceptance rate since Harvard re-instituted the Early Action program (after it was on hiatus for four years). After overseeing a 15 percent increase from 2011 to 2012, this year’s Early Action pool at Harvard was down 3 percent.

According to an article on the Harvard Early figures in “The Crimson,” “‘This year’s applicants are remarkable by any standard. Their academic and extracurricular strengths are impressive—as is their ethnic, economic, and geographic diversity,’ Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid William R. Fitzsimmons ’67 said in a press release.” Can you imagine the Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid at Harvard — or at any college for that matter — saying anything other than the fact that they’ve got this outstanding class of talented students? We think not. Why do they even bother writing these press releases? If you compared the quotes of deans of admissions at various highly selective college year to year, we bet you’d find the same quotes verbatim.

Have a question on the Harvard Early Action figures? Let us know your questions by posting a Comment below. We look forward to hearing from you. And, while you’re here, read about last year’s Early Action numbers at Harvard.

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2 Comments

  • James Anderson says:

    Here is what I find problematic. Harvard deferred over 90% of the students they didn’t accept. If you calculate the numbers the probability is about 3% of these students will be accepted in regular decision and 97% will be rejected in regular decision. If my numbers are correct it is obvious Harvard is self-servingly stringing along students in the vain attempt to keep them from making a decision about another school. I find that to be on the verge of unethical.

    Also there is one universal constant. In any given year you will find the words, “remarkable”, “impressive”, and “diversity” in the Harvard Admissions press release.

  • James Anderson says:

    One more comment/question while I am visiting this site. I have heard Harvard includes withdrawn and incomplete applications as part of their application count. I heard most other schools do not do this. What is the truth about this?

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