Advice for Deferred Applicants

Early Decision Deferrals, Advice for Deferred Students, Deferred in Early Decision

Deferred applicants should not sit back and do nothing. They should hustle. But they need to hustle smartly. At Ivy Coach, we help students hustle smartly every year to turn their deferrals into offers of admission.

We’ve got some advice for deferred applicants. If you applied for admission during the Early Decision or Early Action round and were neither admittedĀ nor denied, you were placed into limbo. Just as Regular Decision has the waitlist, you were essentially waitlisted. It’s the Early equivalent of the waitlist. At most highly selective colleges, around 10% of deferred students earn admission to the school that deferred them. So how do you get to be among the 10% of applicants who turn that deferral into an admission, you ask? In life — and in highly selective college admissions — the answer is not by doing nothing. You’ve got to hustle. And you’ve got to hustle the right way because foolish hustle won’t help you one bit.

For starters, you need to write a letter of enthusiasm. This is a one page letter to the college that deferred you that expresses your continued interest in attending the university. Ideally, the letter discusses what you can bring to the university, what you’ve been up to, and why you’re the perfect fit for their institution. The letter should contain no brags. The letter should be exceptionally written. And the letter should help to sway admissions officers to want to go to bat for you in the Regular Decision round. After all, you showed your commitment to the university during the Early round. You want to inspire them to show their commitment to you in the Regular Decision round. But having sour grapes won’t help. Only by continuing to demonstrate why they should admit you do you have a chance to be among the 10% who turn that deferral into an offer of admission.

We help students year after year turn their deferrals into offers of admission. We help students craft extremely compelling letters that don’t rehash everything that their applications already conveyed. Rather, they offer new information, information that will indeed help their candidacies. So often parents tell us that their children have already written these letters, that they’ve got it covered. Oh really? They’ve strung together 500 words on the page? That’s remarkable. But who says those 500 words strung together are any good? In most cases — in almost all cases — they are generally the opposite of what students should convey. Our students don’t make this mistake. If interested in our assistance with letters of enthusiasm, reach out to us today by filling our our consultation form. Time is of the essence to get these letters in.

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