Alumni Interview Availability

Alumni Interviewing, Alumni Interviews, Alumni Interview

Make yourself available for your alumni interview. And don’t wear sunglasses during it as Tom Cruise’s character did in “Risky Business.”

If you get a call from an alum at a university to which you applied asking that you meet her at 5 PM on either the following Monday or Tuesday for your alumni interview, you should absolutely make yourself available. Too often, students take their sweet time in writing back to these alums or forget altogether to do so. Yikes! And even when they do write back, too many students write something along these lines to the alum: “Hi Karen – I have soccer practice from 3-6 PM every day of the week and my coach would not be happy with me if I missed practice. Would it be possible to meet after 6 on Wednesday? Thank you for understanding.”

Umm, no. That alumni interviewer is unlikely to understand. You have soccer practice every day of the week. Great. Miss a practice to go to your alumni interview. Your coach will have to understand. It’ll be ok. He or she will live to coach another day without you. And as to you suggesting a specific time on a whole different day, who do you think you are? This alum likely has a job. Maybe a family. You are a high school student whose likely only responsibility is to do well in school and pursue your passion (i.e., soccer). Give us a break. The alumni interview is not to be conducted at your convenience. It is to be conducted at the convenience of the interviewer. Oy vey.

Show your respect for the alumni interviewer and your interest in the university to which you’re applying by making a time that they offer you work. Don’t make excuses. Don’t brag about how busy you are. Nobody cares. Just make it work or you’ll very likely end up with a negative evaluation for when that interview does in fact take place.

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1 Comment

  • Susie says:

    I always advise my students to take advantage of a college interview. The face to face contact is almost always a positive factor for college admissions.

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