Working on College Applications

College Apps, College Applications, Applying to Colleges
Many families choose to work with Ivy Coach under our Unlimited Package.

Two years ago, we were asked by a prospective client, “Why would I work with you on 10-20 college applications when 100% of your students earn admission to one of their top three college choices?” The mom’s question, delivered with a dollop or two of snark, felt more like a statement since she didn’t feel like we could offer her an acceptable answer. But not only did we give her an answer, but she signed up her daughter for our Unlimited Package — and she ended up serving as one of our case examples for why Ivy Coach’s Unlimited Package is our most popular package.

Case Examples in the Value of Ivy Coach’s Unlimited Package

So what’d we tell the mom? We told her she’s right. 100% of our students — over the last quarter of a century — do earn admission to one of their top three college choices. But things happen. As an example, we had a student some years ago who ultimately earned admission to all eight Ivy League schools, Stanford, and a host of other elite institutions. Her story became the subject of press articles. But what the articles didn’t state is that she was deferred in the Early round to Harvard. Sometimes, it doesn’t happen right away — we’re focused on the end result — and that’s why we prepare outstanding applications to multiple schools for the Regular Decision round. In this student’s case, we also helped her submit an outstanding Letter of Enthusiasm to Harvard — and she ultimately got in come March. But what if she hadn’t worked with us on multiple outstanding applications…what if she only worked with us on a couple of schools? She likely wouldn’t have felt as confident heading into Regular Decision, particularly after a deferral.

Allow us to share another story. We had another student who earned admission to Princeton in the Early Action round. Since Princeton has a non-binding Early policy and because the student soon soured on her “first choice” school, she applied to Harvard, Yale, Stanford, and MIT in Regular Decision. She ultimately earned admission to Stanford — and chose to attend Stanford over Princeton. Things can change, particularly for whimsical teenagers.

Want another story? We had a student several years ago who refused to heed our advice with respect to school choices. We suggested reach schools that we could work on with her — but her family just didn’t want to listen. They insisted on impossible reach schools. And while the family was so nice, they just didn’t get it. After they cajoled us, we ultimately agreed to work with them on those three impossible reaches in addition to a host of other schools since we felt they understood our stance. We told them — before they signed up for a package — that the student would not count towards our statistics since they were not heeding our advice, which they understood (it’s like going on trial for murder and not listening to your lawyer, choosing to testify against the attorney’s advice!). The student never did earn admission to those impossible reach schools, but she did earn admission to the reach schools we also worked on with her — and the family was very happy in the end. Had the family only worked with us on the three impossible reach schools that we strongly recommended she not even bother applying to, we suspect they’d have had a very different outlook on the college admissions process.

And the mom who asked that question about why families would work with us on more than three schools if 100% of our students earn admission to one of their top three college choices? Her child was the student who earned admission to Princeton in the Early Action round but ultimately chose to attend Stanford. Do our readers now get a sense of the value in working with us under our Unlimited Package? Bye, Felicia is right. We told that mom as much after the student chose to attend Stanford. And she laughed and laughed!

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