Politics and College Admission

College Admissions and Politics, Admission and Politics, College Admissions Process and Politics

Ivy Coach is proud to offer many resources to LGBT college applicants.

We’ve received quite a few comments and emails in the last couple of days in response to two of our recent posts: Undocumented Students in the Ivy League and Colleges Championing LGBT Students. One such comment reads, “Why are you using this college advising platform to espouse political views. Disappinting [sic].” Political views?

A student who earned admission to Yale who has the courage to come out as undocumented in her commencement address. A post that not only shines a lantern on a brave young woman but also offers insight into the very kind of candidate for admission that Yale seeks? Political. Not in the least. Human? You bet.

Colleges that create policies fostering equality. Colleges that make LGBT students, who for generations were made to feel less than and unequal, feel welcome on their campuses. Political. In a time in which our nation mourns the senseless slaughter of 49 LGBT citizens and allies, there is nothing political about institutions that champion human rights and equality.

Yale believed an undocumented young person deserved admission to the university. Based on the character this young person displayed in her high school commencement address, you bet she did. Yale is darn lucky to have her.

A couple of years ago, someone wrote in that they were considering using Ivy Coach as their private college counselor until they read posts of ours that championed LGBT students and offered these students insight into the LGBT climate on campuses across America. We thanked the person for further encouraging us to write more content for LGBT young people. And we’d also like to add: What is political about a private American business exercising its freedom of speech and of the press? Such freedoms are offered to Americans in The United States Constitution. If exercising our constitutional rights is political, then water is dry.

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5 Comments

  • Susie Q. Public says:

    I was also offended by your comments. My daughter has a 36 ACT score, 4.0 GPA with 11 AP courses, three Varsity letters, outstanding public service and leadership, and is renowned for starting a financial literacy program in large metropolitan area DID not gain admission to Yale. She did, however, get accepted to two Ivy League colleges, as well as other top-ranked schools. Our ancestors came to this country legally and have spent the past 400 years (yes, that is correct) building this great nation and contributing to its success. Do you really think it is fair that an illegal alien was given admission preference over my daughter? Think about the message that sends to my daughter and other top-performing students.

    • Ivy Coach says:

      Susie Q,

      We sure do believe that this young woman whom you refer to as an illegal alien (her name is Larissa Martinez) deserved admission to Yale. And, by the way, the profile of your daughter that you presented in your comment suggests that she was a very well-rounded applicant. Yale does not want well-rounded applicants — nor does any other highly selective college so it is no surprise to us that your daughter did not earn admission. And if we offended you by believing that Larissa Martinez is deserving of admission to Yale, know that we stand firmly and unequivocally behind Larissa’s right to a Yale education. Yale is a private institution that is not just for people born in America, whose grandparents and great-grandparents were born in America, the sons and daughters of the American Revolution. Yale is for everyone — for people of all nationalities, of all faiths, of all colors, regardless of their beliefs, sexual orientation, or gender identity. As Yale — and all highly selective colleges — should be. Your comments are despicable and if the apple didn’t fall far from the tree, it’s yet another reason why your daughter didn’t get into Yale. We imagine this comment upset you. We encourage you to vent about your frustrations with the women in your Daughters of the American Revolution club. Enjoy your tea.

      • J says:

        I wholeheartedly agree with the sentiments in the above (IvyCoach) post. Susie, while I do understand it must be frustrating to have your child get rejected from a top college, it’s important to note that hundreds, if not thousands, of students across the US have perfect ACT scores, high GPA’s, and many AP courses. Indeed, I would think admissions officers would almost grow bored reading transcripts and applications which look like this for hours upon hours, and would much rather prefer ‘interesting’ applicants to those with only perfect scores.
        However, another comment Susie made offends me. “Our ancestors came to this country legally and have spent the past 400 years (yes, that is correct) building this great nation and contributing to its success. Do you really think it is fair that an illegal alien was given admission preference over my daughter? Think about the message that sends to my daughter and other top-performing students.” Are you actually suggesting that your daughters’ admission to a college should be determined by her ancestors hard work and not her own? In the same vein, Larissa Martinez should not be punished for her mothers’ illegally immigrating to the US (whether you agree with the immigration or not, that is irrelevant; after all, Larissa was not the one to make the decision to cross the border.) Susie, if you truly believe admissions should be based off of merit, you would recognize the hypocrisy of your words.

  • Eddie P. says:

    It’s a shame some cannot follow or respect the law. An illegal alien (that’s was they are called by law) should be deported to their country of origin. If they can gain legal residency in this country and Yale wants to admit them they are a private university – and if she takes the place of Susie Qa daughter, too bad. If you don’t like the law, try to change it through legislation. Anything else is criminality and a bad example. Period. Amen to that.

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