Our Students Offer Admissions Officers Fighting Words

Admissions Officers, Advocacy in Admissions, Fighting Words for Admissions
Our task is to help our students win over admissions officers — even if one admissions officer can’t see past a low grade or a low score.

We write a lot on the pages of our blog about how we at Ivy Coach help our students present themselves not only as singularly talented but as weird. That’s right. Weird. Our students aren’t cookie cutter one bit. No two students whom we’ve ever worked with have presented themselves in even similar ways. And in our work helping students present themselves as singularly talented (and weird!), we also help them craft fighting words. But, Ivy Coach, what ever do you mean? Fighting words?

If Admissions Officers Are Torn, the Applicant Goes to Committee

Yes, fighting words. Let’s say that one admissions officer is in the corner of one of our students while another doesn’t much like his SAT scores — nor that B+ he received in sophomore year’s AP European History course. Well, that student is likely then headed to committee where his case will be presented before several admissions officers. Our task — through our work in shaping the student’s activities, their storytelling in all their essays, etc. — is to offer that admissions officer in our student’s corner fighting words to advocate for him, to win the room if you will.

Our Task is to Help One Admissions Officer Win the Room

Every sentence in each and every essay matters. Our students don’t write sentences like, “I wish to go to Yale because of it’s strong, liberal arts education.” That sentence is total fluff, fluff that can be cut and pasted for every university in America. There is a word limit on each essay and so every word, every sentence matters. All of these words when put together become fighting words. They help that admissions officer go to bat for our students and so often ultimately help them earn admission to their dream schools. Even, often times, when there’s another admissions officer in the room who really can’t see past that student’s lone B+ and unimpressive SAT score.

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