Johns Hopkins University Class of 2026 Admissions Statistics

Johns Hopkins University has released all RD notifications for the Class of 2026.

Johns Hopkins University has released Regular Decision notifications for its Class of 2026. In all, more than 37,150 students applied to the Baltimore, Maryland-based university. Of these students, 2,408 students earned admission — a figure that reflects both Early Decision admits (822 students) and Regular Decision admits (1,586 students). Johns Hopkins’ overall admission rate for the Class of 2026 thus stands at approximately 6.48%. Curious how these figures compare to the JHU Class of 2025? We’ve got that data for our readers. Curious about the breakdown of the JHU Class of 2026? Wonder no more!

As Hub Staff reports for Hub in a piece entitled “Johns Hopkins Invites 1,586 to Join Class of 2026,” “This year, more than 37,150 students applied from 7,774 high schools around the world, including 729 with first-time applications to Hopkins. The admitted Class of 2026 represents 48 U.S. states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and Guam, as well as 63 other countries. 91% held part-time jobs, internships, or summer jobs during high school; 34% were involved in student government, showing their initiative to drive change in their communities; and 20% will be the first in their families to go to college.”

But those are just dry statistics. As is tradition, Johns Hopkins has released further details on its Class of 2026 — actual anecdotal specifics. We always love that. As Hub Staff writes of some of the admits to the JHU Class of 2026, “They’re advocating for justice and equity—one student is a member of the Youth Policy Initiative in India to improve policies around transgender rights, where they’ve worked with victims to understand sexual abuse laws, and another student created a menstrual health booklet in Arabic while engaging in anti-stigma campaigns. They’re probing important questions of history and engaging with future generations of scholars—one student created and taught a course on models of imperialism, while another conducted an eight-week workshop to teach elementary-aged students about unconventional careers in STEM. And already, they’re contributing to research advancements—an admitted student holds two patents for the first multi-probe injection EpiPen in the world, and another published research on using computational medicine to predict ovarian cancer.”

We wish more schools would soon follow Johns Hopkins’ lead and release such fun, insightful anecdotes as well. We especially love it during years in which our students are featured in these JHU press releases. That’s always quite the thrill!

 
 

You are permitted to use www.ivycoach.com (including the content of the Blog) for your personal, non-commercial use only. You must not copy, download, print, or otherwise distribute the content on our site without the prior written consent of Ivy Coach, Inc.

Categories:

Tags: , , , ,

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *