Stanford Freshman Orientation Activity

Since the 1980s, freshmen at Stanford University have participated in an activity during orientation known as “Crossing the Line.” Basically, someone reads a statement and if the statement applies to students, they walk over a line. It was an activity designed to forge camaraderie, to make students who are far … 

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Admissions Officers Want to Root for Applicants

Twenty-four admissions czars, among them two of the heroes of Ivy Coach’s college admissions blog (Angel Perez of Trinity College and Eric Furda of the University of Pennsylvania — both of whom are typically quite forthright) recently penned an opinion piece for Inside Higher Ed addressed to college-bound students and … 

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On Felicity’s Sentencing in the Varsity Blues Scandal

As our loyal readers know, we wrote a lot about the major college admissions scandal when the news first broke. You know the one. The one involving the bribing of athletic coaches. The one involving fake test proctors who altered students’ answers on the SAT. But as we informed our … 

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Your High School Matters from an Admissions Standpoint

Does where a student goes to high school matter when it comes to his or her chances of admission to America’s most highly selective colleges? The answer, of course, is a resounding yes. But it never ceases to amaze us how many students and parents are under the false impression … 

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Ending the Legacy Advantage

The Editorial Board of The New York Times recently penned a piece calling for an end to the practice of offering preferential treatment to legacies in the college admission process. As we’ve long championed ending legacy admissions, we sure did like the editorial — and particularly because the editorial board … 

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The Insecurity of Elite Colleges

Want to understand why our nation’s elite colleges favor Early applicants over Regular Decision applicants? Want to understand why, say, the University of Pennsylvania admitted 18% of Early Decision candidates while it accepted only 5.5% of Regular Decision candidates? Or why Princeton University admitted 13.9% of Early Action candidates while … 

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The Need-Blind Admissions Lie Exposed

As our loyal readers may know, we were recently very impressed with an article penned by Paul Tough in The New York Times Magazine. The piece, entitled “What College Admissions Offices Really Want,” has our early vote for the most insightful and well written piece about college admissions of the … 

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Admissions Officers Often Admit Students They Don’t Want

There was a piece published this week in The New York Times Magazine penned by Paul Tough that focuses on how our nation’s elite colleges covet diversity in all forms — including socioeconomic diversity — but they also covet money. And ultimately, their “thirst for tuition revenue means that wealth … 

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A Singular Hook in Admissions

If you happened to check out US News & World Report‘s “Best Colleges” issue published this week, you’ll note Ivy Coach was cited in the edition, referencing the importance of a singular hook for applicants to highly selective colleges. Heck, it’s a point we’ve been making for over a quarter … 

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Ties to Donors at California Universities

In the wake of the Varsity Blues scandal, California’s State Assembly has passed a bill that will require colleges that are eligible to receive Cal Grants to disclose how they treat applicants who happen to have ties to alumni and/or donors. The bill, known as AB 697, now heads to … 

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