Graduate Schools’ Political Leanings Concern Some Students

Menachem Wecker

November 16, 2012

Taylor's clients care about academic reputation and rarely weigh schools' political leanings. "And there's little reason for them to do so," she says. "Whether one is conservative or liberal, most U.S. universities lean left and some of the most prestigious universities—the Ivy League universities—lean especially left."

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How to Know if You Should Apply to College Early

Margaret Loftus

September 19, 2012

Early decision applicants can't automatically assume a lowered bar; Miami University in Ohio offers them a mere 1 percent advantage, for example, and Wake Forest University, too, characterizes any edge as slight.

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Should High Schools Limit AP Course Enrollment?

Jason Koebler

January 11, 2012

Some students measure their success by the number of Advanced Placement courses on their transcripts. But some high schools are beginning to push back—worried their students are juggling too much.

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Output Metrics Increasingly Influence College Decisions

Brian Burnsed

September 26, 2011

Looking at inputs and outputs can be an effective way of finding a school that both fits you now and will meet your future goals. Bev Taylor, director of college admissions consulting firm Ivy Coach, notes that input data and output data typically correlate.

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Know if Applying to College Early is Right for You

Margaret Loftus

September 12, 2011

Early decision applicants can't automatically assume a lowered bar; Miami University in Ohio offers them no special advantage, for example, and Wake Forest University characterizes any edge as slight. But as a strategic move, ED can make good sense for students who know what they want and "may not have all the A's, the scores, the activities, or the talent," says Taylor.

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Express Yourself: How to Tell Your Story

Vicky Hallet

August 17, 2007

"Essays can be effective even when they pinpoint something that might seem insignificant in the grand scheme. Bev Taylor, a New York-based independent counselor known as Ivy Coach, worked with a young woman who discarded several failed ideas before writing about her lucky rubber-band ball and how it connected her to her family and friends. Her admissions letter from Williams College included a rubber band for her collection."

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How Schools Get Hot

Rachel Hartigan Shea

August 28, 2006

"Colleges make themselves hot with some savvy self-promotion. "It's the college sending out stuff that starts it happening," says Bev Taylor, a college counselor in Roslyn Heights, N.Y. A flood of glossy brochures will make some kids consider a school they hadn't thought of before."

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